Slow your Christmas: deliberately

Slow your Christmas: deliberately
Photo by Joanna Kosinska on Unsplash

I was talking with a good friend the other day, and she mentioned that what she remembers most in friendships is the things that take time. The beautiful handwritten card from one friend, another friend sitting with her at the hospital while her son had tests, another baking homemade banana bread every time they caught up.

I drove away from her place pondering this idea, the idea that things that take time, things that are slower often are the things that are more meaningful.

But we are coming up to Christmas, and I don’t know if it’s just me but has the Christmas madness started earlier this year?

Are people already too frantic to exchange pleasantries at the checkout? Are they already too frazzled to drive carefully in the car park?

This year I am craving a slow Christmas: a Christmas of intention and connection; a Christmas of being, not consuming; a Christmas of reflection and not hustle.

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Chapter Five: BS, the stories we tell ourselves, and truth

Braving the Wilderness Book club Chapter 5

I am not a person who swears very often, and so Amanda, Elaine and I were laughing about the fact that I drew this chapter for our Braving the Wilderness book club.

In fact I was questioning exactly why Brené felt the need to call this chapter “Speak Truth to Bullshit. Be Civil”, until I got to the definition of BS. (And yes, I’m piking, that’s pretty much it for me on the swearing front).

Brené makes it clear that BS is very different from lying. Because lying is a tacit acknowledgement and fight against the truth, but BS is an absolute refusal to acknowledge truth at all.

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Chapter Two: Who am I?

Braving the Wilderness Chapter 2

To brave the wilderness and become the wilderness we must learn how to trust ourselves and trust others. 

‘Belonging’ … what emotions does that word bring up in you?

For me belonging is a complicated concept. I left Australia at the age of four and returned at fourteen. During these first years of my life I lived in eight different cities. I never lived in a country for more than three years at a time. I am what is called a Third Culture Kid (TCK).

I was Australian by birth, English by accent and international in outlook.

Continue reading “Chapter Two: Who am I?”